Max Rosin

Cypress is an open source testing framework that is described by its maintainers as "Fast, easy and reliable testing for anything that runs in a browser." I started to use it in the CI/CD pipeline of this blog to ensure that the website still works after I made changes. After a few days it has already proven itself to be powerful and easy to use. The only issue I had so far came up when I tried to run my tests against a development site behind basic auth . The primary issue is that the returned URL of cy.url() does not contain the basic auth credentials that are defined in the baseUrl configuration. It took me a moment to figure out why and searching the internet wasn't too helpful so…

Max Rosin

When I migrated my blog to Gatsby it took me a while to find a theme that looked good and satisfied my requirements. In the end I was not able to find an existing Gatsby theme, so I settled on the Future Imperfect theme of HTML5 UP and transformed their template into a Gatsby theme. Implementing the React part of the theme from scratch meant that I needed to integrate all logic like pagination, a RSS feed , etc. from scratch as well. One thing I was missing so far was a proper integration for the Open Graph protocol . The Open Graph protocol is used by other services (e.g. Google, Facebook, Twitter, Telegram) to determine how to display link previews when someone posts a link to…

Max Rosin

When working with Git I sometimes end up with a lot of untracked local files that I want to get rid of. For example, compiling things and testing around can create more stuff than expected or a git reset origin/master rolling back a lot of commits can leave a bunch of leftovers. To me this happens a few times a year and each time I realize that I forgot how I solved it last time. The answer is: git clean . git clean -n Dry-run, show what would be deleted git clean -f Really delete it git clean -d Recurse into untracked directories For me this usually means git clean -f -d and I am done. For more options check out the man page .

Max Rosin

In written text there are (at least) three different types of dashes: the hypen -, the en dash – and the em dash —. They almost look the same and often the hyphen is wrongly used instead of the en or em dash because it is the easiest to type with the - key on the keyboard. But the hypen is only meant to be used to connect two words, e.g. home-office, or to split words on a line break. The en dash is used to define a range (e.g. timespan or distance) between two things, e.g. 3–4 meters or June–August. And then there is the em dash, it is mostly used to put additional parts in the middle or at the end of a sentence, a bit similar to parentheses. The use of an em dash is a stylistic element…

Max Rosin

I have been running a personal GitLab instance for many years now. Today GitLab 13 with many great improvements and new features was released. While the update process of GitLab is normally so stable that I had no issues with enabled auto-updates for years, this time it failed. But of course it wasn't even GitLabs fault... they deprecated a few config options in 12.3 and I missed that change for straight eight months 🤦‍♂️. I am using the GitLab Omnibus package to maintain my instance, so to check out the update issue I tried to manually update GitLab: The error message was pretty clear: I was still using some gitlab_monitor options which have been replaced by gitlab_exporter since…